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October 24, 2005 Now I'm not an objectivist nor am I a libertarian, but I recently stumbled upon a group of artists who seem to ally themselves with these movements. Several things strike me about these artist's work: they link themselves to the old masters of painting and sculpture rather than ignoring them, they emphasize skill over shock value, and positive values such as hope eclipse negative values like nihilism.

The latter is important to me at the moment because I'm trying to create a positive piece that speaks of a better future, not a work filled with despair. Artists like Micheal Newberry can provide inspiration to anyone who is looking for passion, life, and a belief in humanity's ability to progress.

from Michael Newberry's website

Others worth checking out:
Quentin Cordair Gallery, gallery of painters
Nicholas Gaetano, painter
Stuart Mark Feldman, sculptor

October 23, 2005 Beautiful or not?


from website of the town of McCamey


from the Environmental, Science, and Engineering Website

from the Wind Energy Development Programmatic EIS website


from the Shifting Baselines blog

October 19, 2005 I've transferred the drawing from my rough sketchbook onto heavy watercolour paper and started to paint.

For help on this one, I've been looking at old fashioned propaganda posters. Gah! This painting, like most propaganda, is political and tries to convey a message. I hope its the right one! A lot of reading and research lead me to believe that it is.

Propaganda posters have this great positivity about them that I want to capture, a delightful sort of cheeziness. Staring into the future, these people have no worries and can count on each other.



1941 American war poster, pinched from Happydeathinc's propaganda page

October 18, 2005 In addition to this picture, I've also been developing the Art Gallery of Renewable Energy.

This is a collection of all the art work on the internet that deals with renewable energy, in particular solar and wind. There are many interesting artists here, come check them out. Sarah Hall, for instance, creates glass panels with embedded solar panels. William Roy is a painter who wrestles with the problem of what energies will be used in the future, while Brian Borrello has created a forest of solar powered trees.

Have I missed anyone? Contact me if you find other renewable artists.

Pholtovoltaic art glass, by Sarah Hall

October 17, 2005 I've recently gotten caught up in the idea of renewable energy. This isn't just me, I've noticed that a lot of my friends are paying much more attention to the subject too, particularly things like hybrid cars and hydrogen fuel cells.

If you believe that peak oil is upon us, then these technologies are necessary. Even if we have plenty of oil left in the ground and coal in the hills, renewable energies such as wind and solar are vitally important as they don't pollute. These are great ideas and technologies that must be fought for over the next few decades, ideas that we'll need in the future.

My newest work in progress is a piece that extols the benefits of wind energy. Several wind turbines, rolling hills, clouds in the past but sun in the future, and a family looking forward.


older work in progress entries:
October 3-13, 2005. Hands, The Struggle, and Castells



Lope home Lope themes work in progress bio what's new? buy prints contact Lope